kitchen (executable)

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kitchen is the command-line tool for Kitchen, an integration testing tool used by the chef-client. Kitchen runs tests against any combination of platforms using any combination of test suites. Each test, however, is done against a specific instance, which is comprised of a single platform and a single set of testing criteria. This allows each test to be run in isolation, ensuring that different behaviors within the same codebase can be tested thoroughly before those changes are committed to production.

Note

Any Kitchen subcommand that does not specify an instance will be applied to all instances.

Note

This topic details functionality that is packaged with Chef development kit. See http://kitchen.ci/docs/getting-started/ for more information about Kitchen.

Fuzzy Matching

Fuzzy matching can be used with all commands because kitchen uses regular expressions to search. For example, a fully qualified name:

$ kitchen list default-ubuntu-1404 --bare

will return something similar to:

client-ubuntu-1404

A partial name:

$ kitchen list ubuntu --bare

will return something similar to:

client-ubuntu-1404
server-ubuntu-1404

A short string:

$ kitchen list ub --bare

will return something similar to:

client-ubuntu-1404
server-ubuntu-1404

An integer:

$ kitchen list 4 --bare

will return something similar to:

client-ubuntu-1404
server-ubuntu-1404

A single-quoted Ruby regular expression:

$ kitchen list '^cli.*-65$' --bare

will return something similar to:

client-centos-65

kitchen converge

Use the converge subcommand to converge one (or more) instances. Instances are based on the list of platforms in the .kitchen.yml file. This process will install the chef-client on an instance using the omnibus installer, upload cookbook files and minimal configuration to the instance, and then start a chef-client run using the run-list and attributes specified in the .kitchen.yml file.

Kitchen will skip unnecessary steps. For example, if the chef-client is already installed to the instance, Kitchen will not re-install the chef-client. That said, Kitchen will always upload the cookbook files and minimal configuration. This ensures that cookbook testing is being done correctly.

The following exit codes are used by Kitchen:

  • 0 means the operation was successful
  • Any non-zero value means at least one part of the operation was unsuccessful

In general, use the test subcommand to verify the end-to-end quality of a cookbook. Use the converge and verify subcommands during the normal the day-to-day development of a cookbook.

Syntax

This subcommand has the following syntax:

$ kitchen converge PLATFORMS (options)

Options

This subcommand has the following options:

-c, --concurrency
The number of allowed concurrent connections. Default: 9999 (all instances, effectively).
-l, --log-level
The level of logging to be stored in a log file. Options (in order of priority): :debug, :info, :warn, :error, and :fatal. Default: info.
PLATFORMS

Run Kitchen against one or more platforms listed in the .kitchen.yml file. Use all to run Kitchen against all platforms. Use a Ruby regular expression to glob two or more platforms into a single run.

For example, if a .kitchen.yml file contains the following:

- name: centos-5.10
- name: centos-6.5
- name: fedora-19
- name: ubuntu-1004
- name: ubuntu-1204
- name: ubuntu-1310

then a regular expression like (04|5) would run Kitchen against centos-5.10, centos-6.5, ubuntu-1004, and ubuntu-1204. A regular expression like (ubuntu) would run Kitchen against ubuntu-1004, ubuntu-1204, and ubuntu-1310. A regular expression like (fedora-19) would run Kitchen against only fedora-19. Default: all.

Examples

Converge the default CentOS instance

To converge the default CentOS instance, run the following:

$ kitchen converge default-centos-71

The chef-client is downloaded the first time this command is run. The output of the command is similar to:

-----> Starting Kitchen (v1.4.2)
-----> Converging <default-centos-71>...
       Preparing files for transfer
       Preparing cookbooks from project directory
       Removing non-cookbook files before transfer
       Preparing nodes
-----> Installing Chef Omnibus (true)
       downloading https://www.chef.io/chef/install.sh
         to file /tmp/install.sh
       ...
       Downloading Chef ...
       Installing Chef ...
       Thank you for installing Chef!
       Transferring files to <default-centos-71>
       [2014-06-27T18:41:04+00:00] INFO: Forking chef instance to converge...
       Starting Chef Client, version 12.4.1
       [2014-06-27T18:45:18+00:00] INFO: *** Chef 12.4.1 ***
       [2014-06-27T18:45:18+00:00] INFO: Chef-client pid: 3226
       [2014-06-27T18:45:25+00:00] INFO: Setting the run_list to ["recipe[chef-repo::default]"] from CLI options
       [2014-06-27T18:45:25+00:00] INFO: Run List is [recipe[chef-repo::default]]
       [2014-06-27T18:45:25+00:00] INFO: Run List expands to [chef-repo::default]
       [2014-06-27T18:45:25+00:00] INFO: Starting Chef Run for default-centos-71
       [2014-06-27T18:45:25+00:00] INFO: Running start handlers
       [2014-06-27T18:42:40+00:00] INFO: Start handlers complete.
       Compiling Cookbooks...
       Converging 1 resources
       Recipe: chef-repo::default
         * file[/root/test.txt] action create... INFO: Processing file[/root/test.txt]
           action create (chef-repo::default line 10)
       [2014-06-27T18:42:40+00:00] INFO: file[/root/test.txt] created file /root/test.txt
         - create new file /root/test.txt... INFO: file[/root/test.txt] updated file contents /root/test.txt
         - update content in file /root/test.txt from none to d9c88f
       --- /root/test.txt    2014-06-27 18:42:40.695889276 +0000
       +++ /tmp/.test.txt20140627-2810-1xdx98p       2014-06-27 18:42:40.695889276 +0000
       @@ -1 +1,2 @@
       +This file created by Chef!
         - restore selinux security context
       [2014-06-27T18:42:40+00:00] INFO: Chef Run complete in 0.168252291 seconds
       Running handlers:
       [2014-06-27T18:42:40+00:00] INFO: Running report handlers
       Running handlers complete
       [2014-06-27T18:42:40+00:00] INFO: Report handlers complete
       Chef Client finished, 1/1 resources updated in 7.152725504 seconds
       Finished converging <default-centos-71> (0m8.43s).
-----> Kitchen is finished. (0m15.96s)

Converge the default Ubuntu instance

To converge the default Ubuntu instance, run the following:

$ kitchen converge default-ubuntu-1404

The chef-client is downloaded the first time this command is run. The output of the command is similar to:

-----> Starting Kitchen (v1.4.2)
-----> Converging <default-ubuntu-1404>...
       Preparing files for transfer
       Preparing cookbooks from project directory
       Removing non-cookbook files before transfer
       Preparing nodes
-----> Installing Chef Omnibus (true)
       downloading https://www.chef.io/chef/install.sh
         to file /tmp/install.sh
       ...
       Downloading Chef ...
       Installing Chef ...
       Thank you for installing Chef!
       Transferring files to <default-ubuntu-1404>
       [2014-06-27T18:48:01+00:00] INFO: Forking chef instance to converge...
       Starting Chef Client, version 12.4.1
       [2014-06-27T18:48:01+00:00] INFO: *** Chef 12.4.1 ***
       [2014-06-27T18:48:01+00:00] INFO: Chef-client pid: 1246
       [2014-06-27T18:48:03+00:00] INFO: Setting the run_list to ["recipe[chef-repo::default]"] from CLI options
       [2014-06-27T18:48:03+00:00] INFO: Run List is [recipe[chef-repo::default]]
       [2014-06-27T18:48:03+00:00] INFO: Run List expands to [chef-repo::default]
       [2014-06-27T18:48:03+00:00] INFO: Starting Chef Run for default-ubuntu-1404
       [2014-06-27T18:48:03+00:00] INFO: Running start handlers
       [2014-06-27T18:48:03+00:00] INFO: Start handlers complete.
       Compiling Cookbooks...
       Converging 1 resources
       Recipe: chef-repo::default
         * file[/home/vagrant/test.txt] action create... INFO: Processing file[/home/vagrant/test.txt]
           action create (chef-repo::default line 10)
       [2014-06-27T18:48:03+00:00] INFO: file[/home/vagrant/test.txt] created file /home/vagrant/test.txt
         - create new file /home/vagrant/test.txt... INFO: file[/home/vagrant/test.txt] updated file contents /home/vagrant/test.txt
         - update content in file /home/vagrant/test.txt from none to d9c88f
       --- /home/vagrant/test.txt    2014-06-27 18:48:03.233096345 +0000
        +++ /tmp/.test.txt20140627-1246-178u9dg      2014-06-27 18:48:03.233096345 +0000
       @@ -1 +1,2 @@
       +This file created by Chef!
       [2014-06-27T18:48:03+00:00] INFO: Chef Run complete in 0.015439954 seconds
       Running handlers:
       [2014-06-27T18:48:03+00:00] INFO: Running report handlers
       Running handlers complete
       [2014-06-27T18:48:03+00:00] INFO: Report handlers complete
       Chef Client finished, 1/1 resources updated in 1.955915841 seconds
       Finished converging <default-ubuntu-1404> (0m15.67s).
-----> Kitchen is finished. (0m15.96s)

kitchen create

Use the create subcommand to create one (or more) instances. Instances are based on the list of platforms and suites in the .kitchen.yml file.

Syntax

This subcommand has the following syntax:

$ kitchen create PLATFORMS (options)

Options

This subcommand has the following options:

-c, --concurrency
The number of allowed concurrent connections. Default: 9999 (all instances, effectively).
-l, --log-level
The level of logging to be stored in a log file. Options (in order of priority): :debug, :info, :warn, :error, and :fatal. Default: info.
PLATFORMS

Run Kitchen against one or more platforms listed in the .kitchen.yml file. Use all to run Kitchen against all platforms. Use a Ruby regular expression to glob two or more platforms into a single run.

For example, if a .kitchen.yml file contains the following:

- name: centos-5.10
- name: centos-6.5
- name: fedora-19
- name: ubuntu-1004
- name: ubuntu-1204
- name: ubuntu-1310

then a regular expression like (04|5) would run Kitchen against centos-5.10, centos-6.5, ubuntu-1004, and ubuntu-1204. A regular expression like (ubuntu) would run Kitchen against ubuntu-1004, ubuntu-1204, and ubuntu-1310. A regular expression like (fedora-19) would run Kitchen against only fedora-19. Default: all.

Examples

Create the default CentOS instance

To create the default CentOS instance, run the following:

$ kitchen create default-centos-71

CentOS is downloaded the first time this command is run, after which Vagrant is started. (This may take a few minutes.)

The output of the command is similar to:

-----> Starting Kitchen (v1.4.2)
-----> Creating <default-centos-71>...
       Bringing machine 'default' up with 'virtualbox' provider...
       ==> default: Box 'opscode-centos-6.5' could not be found. Attempting to find and install...
           default: Box Provider: virtualbox
           default: Box Version: >= 0
       ==> default: Adding box 'opscode-centos-6.5' (v0) for provider: virtualbox
           default: Downloading: https://opscode-vm-bento.s3.amazonaws.com/vagrant/virtualbox/opscode_centos-6.5_chef-provisionerless.box
       ==> default: Successfully added box 'opscode-centos-6.5' (v0) for 'virtualbox'!
       ==> default: Importing base box 'opscode-centos-6.5'...
       ==> default: Matching MAC address for NAT networking...
       ==> default: Setting the name of the VM: default-centos-71_default_1403650129063_53517
       ==> default: Clearing any previously set network interfaces...
       ==> default: Preparing network interfaces based on configuration...
           default: Adapter 1: nat
       ==> default: Forwarding ports...
           default: 22 => 2222 (adapter 1)
       ==> default: Booting VM...
       ==> default: Waiting for machine to boot. This may take a few minutes...
           default: SSH address: 127.0.0.1:2222
           default: SSH username: vagrant
           default: SSH auth method: private key
           default: Warning: Connection timeout. Retrying...
       ==> default: Machine booted and ready!
       ==> default: Checking for guest additions in VM...
       ==> default: Setting hostname...
       ==> default: Machine not provisioning because `--no-provision` is specified.
       Vagrant instance <default-centos-71> created.
       Finished creating <default-centos-71> (4m0.59s).
-----> Kitchen is finished. (11m29.76s)

Create the default Ubuntu instance

To create the default Ubuntu instance, run the following:

$ kitchen create default-ubuntu-1404

Ubuntu is downloaded the first time this command is run, after which Vagrant is started. (This may take a few minutes.)

The output of the command is similar to:

-----> Starting Kitchen (v1.4.2)
-----> Creating <default-ubuntu-1404>...
       Bringing machine 'default' up with 'virtualbox' provider...
       ==> default: Box 'opscode-ubuntu-12.04' could not be found. Attempting to find and install...
           default: Box Provider: virtualbox
           default: Box Version: >= 0
       ==> default: Adding box 'opscode-ubuntu-12.04' (v0) for provider: virtualbox
           default: Downloading: https://opscode-vm-bento.s3.amazonaws.com/vagrant/virtualbox/opscode_ubuntu-12.04_chef-provisionerless.box
       ==> default: Successfully added box 'opscode-ubuntu-12.04' (v0) for 'virtualbox'!
       ==> default: Importing base box 'opscode-ubuntu-12.04'...
       ==> default: Matching MAC address for NAT networking...
       ==> default: Setting the name of the VM: default-ubuntu-1404_default_1403651715173_54200
       ==> default: Fixed port collision for 22 => 2222. Now on port 2200.
       ==> default: Clearing any previously set network interfaces...
       ==> default: Preparing network interfaces based on configuration...
           default: Adapter 1: nat
       ==> default: Forwarding ports...
           default: 22 => 2200 (adapter 1)
       ==> default: Booting VM...
==> default: Waiting for machine to boot. This may take a few minutes...
           default: SSH username: vagrant
           default: SSH auth method: private key
           default: Warning: Connection timeout. Retrying...
       ==> default: Machine booted and ready!
       ==> default: Checking for guest additions in VM...
       ==> default: Setting hostname...
       ==> default: Machine not provisioning because `--no-provision` is specified.
       Vagrant instance <default-ubuntu-1404> created.
       Finished creating <default-ubuntu-1404> (4m1.59s).
-----> Kitchen is finished. (10m58.24s)

kitchen destroy

Use the destroy subcommand to delete one (or more) instances. Instances are based on the list of platforms and suites in the .kitchen.yml file.

Syntax

This subcommand has the following syntax:

$ kitchen destroy PLATFORMS (options)

Options

This subcommand has the following options:

-c, --concurrency
The number of allowed concurrent connections. Default: 9999 (all instances, effectively).
-l, --log-level
The level of logging to be stored in a log file. Options (in order of priority): :debug, :info, :warn, :error, and :fatal. Default: info.
PLATFORMS

Run Kitchen against one or more platforms listed in the .kitchen.yml file. Use all to run Kitchen against all platforms. Use a Ruby regular expression to glob two or more platforms into a single run.

For example, if a .kitchen.yml file contains the following:

- name: centos-5.10
- name: centos-6.5
- name: fedora-19
- name: ubuntu-1004
- name: ubuntu-1204
- name: ubuntu-1310

then a regular expression like (04|5) would run Kitchen against centos-5.10, centos-6.5, ubuntu-1004, and ubuntu-1204. A regular expression like (ubuntu) would run Kitchen against ubuntu-1004, ubuntu-1204, and ubuntu-1310. A regular expression like (fedora-19) would run Kitchen against only fedora-19. Default: all.

Examples

None.

kitchen diagnose

Use the diagnose subcommand to show a computed diagnostic configuration for one (or more) instances. This subcommand will make all implicit configuration settings explicit because it echoes back all of the configuration data as YAML.

Syntax

This subcommand has the following syntax:

$ kitchen diagnose PLATFORMS (options)

Options

This subcommand has the following options:

--all
Include all diagnostics. Default: false.
--instances
Include instance diagnostics. Default: true.
-l, --log-level
The level of logging to be stored in a log file. Options (in order of priority): :debug, :info, :warn, :error, and :fatal. Default: info.
--loader
Include data loader diagnostics. Default: false.
PLATFORMS

Run Kitchen against one or more platforms listed in the .kitchen.yml file. Use all to run Kitchen against all platforms. Use a Ruby regular expression to glob two or more platforms into a single run.

For example, if a .kitchen.yml file contains the following:

- name: centos-5.10
- name: centos-6.5
- name: fedora-19
- name: ubuntu-1004
- name: ubuntu-1204
- name: ubuntu-1310

then a regular expression like (04|5) would run Kitchen against centos-5.10, centos-6.5, ubuntu-1004, and ubuntu-1204. A regular expression like (ubuntu) would run Kitchen against ubuntu-1004, ubuntu-1204, and ubuntu-1310. A regular expression like (fedora-19) would run Kitchen against only fedora-19. Default: all.

Examples

Diagnose an instance

Use the --loader option to include diagnostic data in the output:

---
loader:
  combined_config:
    filename:
    raw_data:
      driver:
        name: vagrant
        socket: tcp://192.168.12.34:1234
    provisioner:
     #...

or:

---
loader:
  global_config:
    filename: "/Users/username/.kitchen/config.yml"
    raw_data: #...
  project_config:
    filename: "/Users/username/Projects/sandbox/path/to/kitchen.yml"
    raw_data: #...
  local_config:

Diagnose an instance using –instances option

Use the --instances option to track instances, which are based on the list of platforms and suites in the .kitchen.yml file:

---
instances
  default-ubuntu-1204
    busser:
      root_path: /tmp/busser
      ruby_bindir: /opt/chef/embedded/bin
      sudo: true

Diagnose an instance using –loader option

This command returns data as YAML:

---
timestamp: 2014-04-15 18:59:58.460470000 Z
kitchen-version: 1.2.2.dev
instances:
  default-ubuntu-1404
    # ...
  default-centos-65
    # ...

When Kitchen is being used to test cookbooks, Kitchen will track state data:

---
instances:
  default-ubuntu-1404
    state_file:
      hostname: 192.168.123.456
      last_action: create
      port: '22'
      ssh_key: "/Users/username/path/to/key"
      username: vagrant
  default-centos-65
    # ...

and will track information that was given to a driver:

---
instances:
  default-ubuntu-1404
    driver:
      box: opscode-ubuntu-12.04
      box_url: https://URL/path/to/filename.box
      kitchen_root: "/Users/username/Projects/sandbox/"

and will track information about provisioners:

---
instances:
  default-ubuntu-1404
    provisioner:
      attributes: {}
      chef_omnibus_url: https://www.chef.io/chef/install.sh
      clients_path:
      name: chef_zero

kitchen driver create

Use the driver create subcommand to create a new Kitchen driver in the RubyGems project.

Syntax

This subcommand has the following syntax:

$ kitchen driver create NAME

Options

This subcommand has the following options:

-l, --license
The license for the RubyGems file. Possible values: apachev2, lgplv3, mit, and reserved. Default: apachev2.

Examples

None.

kitchen driver discover

Use the driver discover subcommand to discover Kitchen driver that have been published to RubyGems. This subcommand will return all RubyGems that are match kitchen-*.

Syntax

This subcommand has the following syntax:

$ kitchen driver discover

Options

This subcommand does not have any options.

Examples

None.

kitchen exec

Use the exec subcommand to execute a command on a remote instance.

Syntax

This subcommand has the following syntax:

$ kitchen exec PLATFORMS (options)

Options

This subcommand has the following options:

-c REMOTE_COMMAND
Use to specify a remote command to be run via SSH.
PLATFORMS

Run Kitchen against one or more platforms listed in the .kitchen.yml file. Use all to run Kitchen against all platforms. Use a Ruby regular expression to glob two or more platforms into a single run.

For example, if a .kitchen.yml file contains the following:

- name: centos-5.10
- name: centos-6.5
- name: fedora-19
- name: ubuntu-1004
- name: ubuntu-1204
- name: ubuntu-1310

then a regular expression like (04|5) would run Kitchen against centos-5.10, centos-6.5, ubuntu-1004, and ubuntu-1204. A regular expression like (ubuntu) would run Kitchen against ubuntu-1004, ubuntu-1204, and ubuntu-1310. A regular expression like (fedora-19) would run Kitchen against only fedora-19. Default: all.

Examples

None.

kitchen init

Use the init subcommand to create an initial Kitchen environment, including:

  • Creating a .kitchen.yml file
  • Appending Kitchen to the RubyGems file, .gitignore, and .thor
  • Creating the test/integration/default directory

Syntax

This subcommand has the following syntax:

$ kitchen init

Options

This subcommand has the following options:

--create_gemfile
Create a RubyGems file, if one does not already exist. Default: false.
-D, --driver
Add one (or more) Kitchen drivers to a RubyGems file. Default: kitchen-vagrant.
-l, --log-level
The level of logging to be stored in a log file. Options (in order of priority): :debug, :info, :warn, :error, and :fatal. Default: info.
-P, --provisioner
The default provisioner that is used by Kitchen.
PLATFORMS

Run Kitchen against one or more platforms listed in the .kitchen.yml file. Use all to run Kitchen against all platforms. Use a Ruby regular expression to glob two or more platforms into a single run.

For example, if a .kitchen.yml file contains the following:

- name: centos-5.10
- name: centos-6.5
- name: fedora-19
- name: ubuntu-1004
- name: ubuntu-1204
- name: ubuntu-1310

then a regular expression like (04|5) would run Kitchen against centos-5.10, centos-6.5, ubuntu-1004, and ubuntu-1204. A regular expression like (ubuntu) would run Kitchen against ubuntu-1004, ubuntu-1204, and ubuntu-1310. A regular expression like (fedora-19) would run Kitchen against only fedora-19. Default: all.

Examples

Create the Kitchen environment

$ kitchen init --driver=kitchen-vagrant

will return something similar to:

create .kitchen.yml
create test/integration/default
create .gitignore
append .gitignore
append .gitignore
run    gem install kitchen-vagrant from "."
Fetching: kitchen-vagrant-0.12.0.gem (100%)
Successfully installed kitchen-vagrant-0.12.0
1 gem installed

kitchen list

Use the list subcommand to view the list of instances. Instances are based on the list of platforms in the .kitchen.yml file. Kitchen will auto-name instances by combining a suite name with a platform name. For example, if a suite is named default and a platform is named ubuntu-10.04, then the instance would be default-ubuntu-10.04. This ensures that Kitchen instances have safe DNS and hostname records.

Syntax

This subcommand has the following syntax:

$ kitchen list PLATFORMS (options)

Options

This subcommand has the following options:

-b, --bare
Print the name of each instance, one instance per line. Default: false.
-l, --log-level
The level of logging to be stored in a log file. Options (in order of priority): :debug, :info, :warn, :error, and :fatal. Default: info.
PLATFORMS

Run Kitchen against one or more platforms listed in the .kitchen.yml file. Use all to run Kitchen against all platforms. Use a Ruby regular expression to glob two or more platforms into a single run.

For example, if a .kitchen.yml file contains the following:

- name: centos-5.10
- name: centos-6.5
- name: fedora-19
- name: ubuntu-1004
- name: ubuntu-1204
- name: ubuntu-1310

then a regular expression like (04|5) would run Kitchen against centos-5.10, centos-6.5, ubuntu-1004, and ubuntu-1204. A regular expression like (ubuntu) would run Kitchen against ubuntu-1004, ubuntu-1204, and ubuntu-1310. A regular expression like (fedora-19) would run Kitchen against only fedora-19. Default: all.

Examples

View a list of Kitchen instances

To view the list of Kitchen instances:

$ kitchen list

A list will be returned, similar to:

Instance              Driver   Provisioner   Last Action
default-ubuntu-10.04  vagrant  chef_zero     created
default-centos-6.5    vagrant  chef_zero     created

or:

Instance              Driver   Provisioner   Last Action
default-ubuntu-10.04  vagrant  chef_zero     converged
default-centos-6.5    vagrant  chef_zero     created

or:

Instance              Driver   Provisioner   Last Action
default-ubuntu-10.04  vagrant  chef_zero     verified
default-centos-6.5    vagrant  chef_zero     created

or:

Instance              Driver   Provisioner   Last Action
default-ubuntu-10.04  vagrant  chef_zero     created
default-centos-6.5    vagrant  chef_zero     <not created>

or if there are multiple suites defined, such as default and test:

Instance              Driver   Provisioner   Last Action
default-ubuntu-10.04  vagrant  chef_zero     <not created>
default-centos-6.5    vagrant  chef_zero     <not created>
test-ubuntu-10.04     vagrant  chef_zero     <not created>
test-centos-6.5       vagrant  chef_zero     <not created>

kitchen login

Use the login subcommand to log in to a single instance. Instances are based on the list of platforms and suites in the .kitchen.yml file. After logging in successfully, the instance can be interacted with just like any other virtual machine, including adding or removing packages, starting or stopping services, and so on. It’s a sandbox. Make any change necessary to help improve the coverage for cookbook testing.

Syntax

This subcommand has the following syntax:

$ kitchen login PLATFORM (options)

Options

This subcommand has the following options:

-l, --log-level
The level of logging to be stored in a log file. Options (in order of priority): :debug, :info, :warn, :error, and :fatal. Default: info.
PLATFORMS

Run Kitchen against one or more platforms listed in the .kitchen.yml file. Use all to run Kitchen against all platforms. Use a Ruby regular expression to glob two or more platforms into a single run.

For example, if a .kitchen.yml file contains the following:

- name: centos-5.10
- name: centos-6.5
- name: fedora-19
- name: ubuntu-1004
- name: ubuntu-1204
- name: ubuntu-1310

then a regular expression like (04|5) would run Kitchen against centos-5.10, centos-6.5, ubuntu-1004, and ubuntu-1204. A regular expression like (ubuntu) would run Kitchen against ubuntu-1004, ubuntu-1204, and ubuntu-1310. A regular expression like (fedora-19) would run Kitchen against only fedora-19. Default: all.

Examples

To login to the default Ubuntu instance, run the following:

$ kitchen login default-ubuntu-14.04

to return something similar to:

Welcome to Ubuntu 14.04.2 LTS (GNU/Linux 3.5.0-23-generic x86_64)
Last login: Mon Mar 28 17:34:26 2014 from 127.0.0.5
vagrant@default-ubuntu-14.04:~$

kitchen setup

Use the setup subcommand to set up one (or more) instances. Instances are based on the list of platforms in the .kitchen.yml file.

Syntax

This subcommand has the following syntax:

$ kitchen setup PLATFORMS (options)

Options

This subcommand has the following options:

-c, --concurrency
The number of allowed concurrent connections. Default: 9999 (all instances, effectively).
-l, --log-level
The level of logging to be stored in a log file. Options (in order of priority): :debug, :info, :warn, :error, and :fatal. Default: info.
PLATFORMS

Run Kitchen against one or more platforms listed in the .kitchen.yml file. Use all to run Kitchen against all platforms. Use a Ruby regular expression to glob two or more platforms into a single run.

For example, if a .kitchen.yml file contains the following:

- name: centos-5.10
- name: centos-6.5
- name: fedora-19
- name: ubuntu-1004
- name: ubuntu-1204
- name: ubuntu-1310

then a regular expression like (04|5) would run Kitchen against centos-5.10, centos-6.5, ubuntu-1004, and ubuntu-1204. A regular expression like (ubuntu) would run Kitchen against ubuntu-1004, ubuntu-1204, and ubuntu-1310. A regular expression like (fedora-19) would run Kitchen against only fedora-19. Default: all.

Examples

None.

kitchen test

Use the test subcommand to test one (or more) verified instances. Instances are based on the list of platforms and suites in the .kitchen.yml file. This subcommand will create a new instance (cleaning up a previous instance, if necessary), converge that instance, set up the test harness, verify the instance using that test harness, and then destroy the instance.

In general, use the test subcommand to verify the end-to-end quality of a cookbook. Use the converge and verify subcommands during the normal the day-to-day development of a cookbook.

Syntax

This subcommand has the following syntax:

$ kitchen test PLATFORMS (options)

Options

This subcommand has the following options:

--auto-init
Invoke the init command if .kitchen.yml is missing. Default: false.
-c NUMBER, --concurrency NUMBER
The number of allowed concurrent connections. Use this option to limit the number of instances that are tested concurrently. For example, --concurrency 6 will set this limit to six concurrent instances. Default: 9999 (all instances, effectively).
-d, --destroy
The destroy strategy used at the conclusion of a Kitchen run. Possible values: always (always destroy instances), never (never destroy instances), or passing (only destroy instances that passed). Default: passing.
-l, --log-level
The level of logging to be stored in a log file. Options (in order of priority): :debug, :info, :warn, :error, and :fatal. Default: info.
PLATFORMS

Run Kitchen against one or more platforms listed in the .kitchen.yml file. Use all to run Kitchen against all platforms. Use a Ruby regular expression to glob two or more platforms into a single run.

For example, if a .kitchen.yml file contains the following:

- name: centos-5.10
- name: centos-6.5
- name: fedora-19
- name: ubuntu-1004
- name: ubuntu-1204
- name: ubuntu-1310

then a regular expression like (04|5) would run Kitchen against centos-5.10, centos-6.5, ubuntu-1004, and ubuntu-1204. A regular expression like (ubuntu) would run Kitchen against ubuntu-1004, ubuntu-1204, and ubuntu-1310. A regular expression like (fedora-19) would run Kitchen against only fedora-19. Default: all.

Examples

Test the default Ubuntu instance

To test the default Ubuntu instance, run the following:

$ kitchen test default-ubuntu-14.04

to return something similar to:

-----> Starting Kitchen (v1.0.0)
-----> Cleaning up any prior instances of <default-ubuntu-14.04>
-----> Destroying <default-ubuntu-14.04>...
...
Finished destroying <default-ubuntu-14.04> (0m3.06s).
-----> Testing <default-ubuntu-14.04>
-----> Creating <default-ubuntu-14.04>...
Bringing machine 'default' up with 'virtualbox' provider...
...
Vagrant instance <default-ubuntu-14.04> created.
Finished creating <default-ubuntu-14.04> (0m46.22s).
-----> Converging <default-ubuntu-14.04>...
...
-----> Installing Chef Omnibus (true)
downloading https://www.chef.io/chef/install.sh
...
Installing Chef
...
Setting up chef (11.12.0-1.ubuntu.12.04) ...
Thank you for installing Chef!
...
Starting Chef Client, version 11.12.0
...
Converging 2 resources
Recipe: git::default
  * package[git] action install[date/time] INFO: Processing package[git] action install (git::default line 10)

    - install version 1:2.3.4.5-6 of package git

  * log[log_description] action write[date/time] INFO: Processing log[log_description] action write (git::default line 5)
...
Chef Client finished, 2 resources updated
Finished converging <default-ubuntu-14.04> (0m45.17s).
-----> Starting Kitchen (v1.0.0)
-----> Setting up <default-ubuntu-14.04>
Fetching: <name of test tool> (100%)
Successfully installed <name of test tool>
# gems installed
-----> Setting up <name of test tool>
...
-----> Running <name of test tool> test suite
 ✓ <test result>

2 tests, 0 failures
     Finished verifying <default-ubuntu-14.04> (2m1.12s).
-----> Kitchen is finished. (2m3.45s)
$ echo $?
0

Test an instance using –concurrency option

Use the --concurrency option to control the number of instances that are tested concurrently on the local workstation. The default setting is to test all instances, but the practical setting depends on the capabilities of the local machine itself. The following examples will limit the number of instances to four:

$ kitchen test --concurrency=4

or:

$ kitchen test --concurrency 4

or:

$ kitchen test -c=4

or:

$ kitchen test -c 4

kitchen verify

Use the verify subcommand to verify one (or more) instances. Instances are based on the list of platforms and suites in the .kitchen.yml file.

In general, use the test subcommand to verify the end-to-end quality of a cookbook. Use the converge and verify subcommands during the normal the day-to-day development of a cookbook.

Syntax

This subcommand has the following syntax:

$ kitchen verify PLATFORMS (options)

Options

This subcommand has the following options:

-c, --concurrency
The number of allowed concurrent connections. Default: 9999 (all instances, effectively).
-l, --log-level
The level of logging to be stored in a log file. Options (in order of priority): :debug, :info, :warn, :error, and :fatal. Default: info.
PLATFORMS

Run Kitchen against one or more platforms listed in the .kitchen.yml file. Use all to run Kitchen against all platforms. Use a Ruby regular expression to glob two or more platforms into a single run.

For example, if a .kitchen.yml file contains the following:

- name: centos-5.10
- name: centos-6.5
- name: fedora-19
- name: ubuntu-1004
- name: ubuntu-1204
- name: ubuntu-1310

then a regular expression like (04|5) would run Kitchen against centos-5.10, centos-6.5, ubuntu-1004, and ubuntu-1204. A regular expression like (ubuntu) would run Kitchen against ubuntu-1004, ubuntu-1204, and ubuntu-1310. A regular expression like (fedora-19) would run Kitchen against only fedora-19. Default: all.

Examples

Verify the default Ubuntu instance

To verify the default Ubuntu instance, run the following:

$ kitchen verify default-ubuntu-10.04

to return something similar to:

-----> Starting Kitchen (v1.0.0)
-----> Setting up <default-ubuntu-10.04>
Fetching: <name of test tool> (100%)
Successfully installed <name of test tool>
# gems installed
-----> Setting up <name of test tool>
...
-----> Running <name of test tool> test suite
 ✓ <test result>

2 tests, 0 failures
     Finished verifying <default-ubuntu-10.04> (2m1.12s).
-----> Kitchen is finished. (2m3.45s)
$ echo $?
0

or:

-----> Starting Kitchen (v1.0.0)
-----> Setting up <default-ubuntu-10.04>
Fetching: <name of test tool> (100%)
Successfully installed <name of test tool>
# gems installed
-----> Setting up <name of test tool>
...
-----> Running <name of test tool> test suite
 - <test result>

2 tests, 1 failures
... exit code was 1
$ echo $?
10

kitchen version

Use the version subcommand to print the version of Kitchen.

Syntax

This subcommand has the following syntax:

$ kitchen version

Options

This subcommand does not have any options.

Examples

Verify the version of Kitchen

To view the version of Kitchen:

$ kitchen version

will return something similar to:

Text Kitchen version 1.0.0