Microsoft Azure Portal

[edit on GitHub]

Microsoft Azure is a cloud hosting platform from Microsoft that provides virtual machines. The Azure production portal (https://portal.azure.com/) can boostrap Microsoft Windows-based virtual machines that are already provisioned with the chef-client running as a background service. Once provisioned, these virtual machines are ready to be managed by Chef.

To use the Chef integration with the Azure portal, all you need is a Chef server and the Azure portal. Choose a Chef version or deploy a Chef server via the Azure Marketplace (https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/marketplace/partners/chef-software/chef-server/).

The Chef extension on the Azure portal may be used on the following platforms:

  • Windows Server 2012, 2012r2
  • Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, 14.04 LTS

Note

Virtual machines running on Microsoft Azure can also be provisioned from the command-line using the knife azure plugin for knife. This approach is ideal for cases that require automation or for users who are more suited to command-line interfaces.

Azure Marketplace

Chef Server

Chef provides a fully functional Chef server that can be launched from the Azure Marketplace. This server is preconfigured with Chef server, the Chef management console, Reporting, and Chef Analytics. This configuration is free to use for deployments under 25 nodes, and can be licensed for deployments beyond 25 nodes. (See https://www.chef.io/pricing/ for more information about licensing more than 25 nodes.)

Before getting started, you will need a functioning workstation. Install the Chef development kit on that workstation.

Note

The following steps assume that Chef is installed on the workstation and that the knife ssl fetch subcommand is available. The knife ssl fetch subcommand was added to Chef in the 11.16 release of the chef-client, and then packaged as part of the Chef development kit starting with the 0.3 release.)

  1. Sign in to the Azure portal (https://portal.azure.com). (The Azure Marketplace offering is only available via the preview portal.) Authenticate using your Microsoft Azure account credentials.

  2. Click the New icon in the lower left corner of the portal.

  3. Click Compute, then click Azure Marketplace.

  4. In the search box enter Chef Server.

  5. Select the Chef Server 12 offering that is appropriate for your size.

    Note

    The Chef server is available on the Azure Marketplace in 25, 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 licensed images, as well as a “Bring Your Own License” image.

  6. Click Create and follow the steps to launch the Chef server, providing a host name, user name, password or SSH key, and any additional information required. You will also select your deployment model here.

  7. Create a DNS Name label for the instance. <https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/virtual-machines-create-fqdn-on-portal/>

  8. Once the instance is launched you will need to create an account to use with the Chef management console. To do this, open an SSH connection to the host using the user name and password (or SSH key) provided when you launched the instance.

  9. Wait for the Chef server to complete initial configuration. You’ll want to tail the cloud-init logfile until it has finished. For example:

    $ tailf /var/log/cloud-init-output.log
    

    will return something similar to:

    cloud-init v. 0.7.5 finished at Thu, 05 May 2016 21:41:21 +0000. Datasource DataSourceAzureNet [seed=/dev/sr0].  Up 740.33 seconds
    
  10. After cloud-init has completed, configure the Chef server with the DNS Name.

    Note

    In the following steps substitute <fqdn> for the fully qualified domain DNS NAME that you created.

  11. Remove the Nginx configuration for the existing Chef Analytics configuration:

    $ sudo rm /var/opt/opscode/nginx/etc/nginx.d/analytics.conf
    
  12. Update the /etc/chef-marketplace/marketplace.rb file to include the api_fqdn of the machine:

    $ echo 'api_fqdn "<fqdn>"' | sudo tee -a /etc/chef-marketplace/marketplace.rb
    
  13. Update the /etc/opscode-analytics/opscode-analytics.rb file to include the analytics_fqdn of the machine:

    $ echo 'analytics_fqdn "<fqdn>"' | sudo tee -a /etc/opscode-analytics/opscode-analytics.rb
    
  14. Run the following command to update the hostname and reconfigure the software:

    $ sudo chef-marketplace-ctl hostname <fqdn>
    
  15. Run the following command to update reconfigure Chef Analytics:

    $ sudo opscode-analytics-ctl reconfigure
    
  16. Now proceed to the web based setup wizard https://<fqdn>/signup.

  17. Before you can run through the wizard you must provide the VM Name or DNS Label of the instance in order to ensure that only you are configuring the Chef server.

  18. Follow the links to sign up for a new account and download the starter kit.

  19. Extract the starter kit zip file downloaded. Open a command prompt and change into the chef-repo directory extracted from the starter kit.

  20. Run knife ssl fetch to retrieve the SSL keys for the Chef server.

  21. Run knife client list to test the connection to the Chef server. The command should return <orgname>-validator, where <orgname> is the name of the organization you previously created. You are now ready to add virtual machines to your Chef server.

Chef Compliance

Chef provides a fully functional Chef Compliance image that can be launched from the Azure Marketplace.

  1. Sign in to the Azure portal (https://portal.azure.com). (The Azure Marketplace offering is only available via the preview portal.) Authenticate using your Microsoft Azure account credentials.

  2. Click the New icon in the lower left corner of the portal.

  3. Click Compute, then click Azure Marketplace.

  4. In the search box enter Chef Compliance.

  5. Select the Chef Compliance offering that is appropriate for your size.

    Note

    Chef Compliance is available on the Azure Marketplace in 5, 25, 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 licensed images.

  6. Click Create and follow the steps to launch the Chef Compliance image, providing a host name, user name, password or SSH key, and any additional information required. You will also select your deployment model here.

    Note

    If you are using the “Resource Manager” deployment model, you will need to create a DNS Name label for the instance. <https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/virtual-machines-create-fqdn-on-portal/>

  7. Once the virtual machine is launched you will need to create an account. To do this, open an SSH connection to the host using the user name and password (or SSH key) provided when you launch the virtual machine.

    Note

    In the following steps substitute <fqdn> for the fully qualified domain DNS NAME that you created.

  8. Update the /etc/chef-marketplace/marketplace.rb file to include the api_fqdn of the machine.

    $ echo 'api_fqdn "<fqdn>"' | sudo tee -a /etc/chef-marketplace/marketplace.rb
    
  9. Update the /etc/chef-compliance/chef-compliance.rb file to include the fqdn of the machine.

    $ echo 'fqdn "<fqdn>"' | sudo tee -a /etc/chef-compliance/chef-compliance.rb
    
  10. Run the following command to update the hostname and reconfigure the software:

    $ sudo chef-marketplace-ctl hostname <fqdn>
    $ sudo chef-compliance-ctl reconfigure
    
  11. Now proceed to the web based setup wizard https://<fqdn>/#/setup

  12. Before you can run through the wizard you must provide the VM Name of the instance in order to ensure that only you are configuring the Chef Compliance instance.

  13. Follow the prompts to sign up for a new account.

chef-client Settings

Before virtual machines are created using the Azure portal, some chef-client-specific settings will need to be identified so they may be provided to the Azure portal during the virtual machine creation workflow. These settings are available from the chef-client configuration settings:

  1. The chef_server_url and validaton_client_name. These are settings in the client.rb file.
  2. The file for the validator key.

Set up Virtual Machines

Once this information has been identified, launch the Azure portal, start the virtual machine creation workflow, and then bootstrap virtual machines with Chef:

  1. Sign in to the Azure production portal (https://portal.azure.com/). Authenticate using your Microsoft Azure account credentials.

  2. Choose Virtual Machines in the left pane of the portal.

  3. Click the New option at the bottom of the portal.

  4. Choose Virtual Machine, and then From Gallery.

  5. Choose one of the following Featured Images (currently only Microsoft Windows images are supported): Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter or Windows Server 2012 Datacenter.

  6. Fill in the virtual machine configuration information, such as machine name, user name, and so on. When finished, click to the next page.

    Note

    It’s best to use a new computer name each time through this workflow. This will help to avoid conflicts with virtual machine names that may have been previously registered on the Chef server.

  7. Make the desired changes, if any, to the cloud service name, storage account, endpoints, etc., and then click to the next page.

  8. Install Chef. Click the checkbox next to Chef to configure virtual machines using with Chef:

    _images/azure_portal.png
  9. Click the From Local button next to the client.rb text box, and then browse to upload the client.rb file.

    Note

    The client.rb must be correctly configured to communicate to the Chef server. Specifically, it must have valid values for the following two settings: chef_server_url and validaton_client_name.

  10. Use the From Local button next to the validation key text box to locate a local copy of the validation key.

  11. Optional. Use a run-list to specify what should be run when the virtual machine is provisioned, such as using the run-list to provision a virtual machine with Internet Information Services (IIS). Use the iis cookbook and the default recipe to build a run-list. For example:

    iis
    

    or:

    iis::default
    

    or:

    recipe['iis']
    

    A run-list can also be built using a role. For example, if a role named backend_server is defined on the Chef server, the run-list would look like:

    role['backend_server']
    

    Even without a run-list, the virtual machine will periodically check with the Chef server to see if the configuration requirements change. This means that the run-list can be updated later, by editing the run-list to add the desired run-list items by using the Chef server web user interface or by using the knife command line tool.

    Note

    A run-list may only refer to roles and/or recipes that have already been uploaded to the Chef server.

  12. Click the checkmark button to complete the page. Provisioning will begin and the application will return to the Virtual Machines page showing the list of available virtual machines.

    When the virtual machine has reached the status starting, click the virtual machine name to go to a page that contains more detail. Click dashboard to see more detailed status, and scroll down to the area that says extensions.

    Once the virtual machine has gone far enough in the running(provisioning) state, some entries should appear under status, like this:

    _images/azure_portal_1.png
  13. Once finished, something like the following will be shown:

    _images/azure_portal_2.png

After the process is complete, the virtual machine will be registered with the Chef server and it will have been provisioned with the configuration (applications, services, etc.) from the specified run-list. The Chef server can now be used to perform all ongoing management of the virtual machine node.

Azure Chef Extension

The Azure Chef Extension is an extension for Microsoft Azure to enable Chef on virtual machine instances. The extension makes available two Windows PowerShell cmdlets and two Microsoft Azure CLI commands.

Azure CLI

If the Microsoft Azure cross-platform command line tool (Xplat-CLI) is installed on the workstation, along with the Azure Chef Extension, the get-chef and set-chef extensions may be used to manage Chef running on virtual machines in Microsoft Azure.

get-chef

Use the get-chef command to get the details for the Azure Chef Extension that is running on the named virtual machine.

Syntax

This command has the following syntax:

$ azure vm extension get-chef VM_NAME

set-chef

Use the set-chef command to enable Chef on any virtual machine running on Microsoft Azure.

Syntax

This command has the following syntax:

$ azure vm extension set-chef VM_NAME (options)
Options

This command has the following options:

-a, --auto-update-client
Auto-update the chef-client. Set to true to auto update the version of the Azure Chef Extension when the virtual machine is restarted. For example, if this option is enabled, a virtual machine that has version 1205.12.2.0 will be updated automatically to 1205.12.2.1 when it is published. Default value: false.
-b, --disable
Disable the Azure Chef Extension extension.
-c PATH_TO_CONFIG, --client-config PATH_TO_CONFIG
The path to the client.rb file.
-C CLIENT_PEM, --client-pem CLIENT_PEM
The location of the file that contains the client key. Default value: /etc/chef/client.pem.
-D, --delete-chef-config
Disable the Azure Chef Extension extension.
-j JSON, --bootstrap-options JSON

A JSON string that is added to the first run of a chef-client. For example:

-j '{"chef_node_name":"test_node"}'

Supported options: "chef_node_name", "chef_server_url" (required), "environment", "secret", and "validation_client_name" (required).

-O VALIDATOR_PEM, --validation-pem VALIDATOR_PEM
The location of the file that contains the key used when a chef-client is registered with a Chef server. A validation key is signed using the validation_client_name for authentication. Default value: /etc/chef/validation.pem.
-R RUN_LIST, --run-list RUN_LIST
A comma-separated list of roles and/or recipes to be applied.
-u, --uninstall
Uninstall the Azure Chef Extension.
-V NUMBER, --version NUMBER
Specify the version number for the Azure Chef Extension extension. Default is to use the latest extension’s version number.
Examples

The following examples show how to use this knife subcommand:

Create a virtual machine

$ azure vm create your-vm-name MSFT__Windows-Server-2008-R2-SP1.11-29-2011 yourusername yourpassword --location "West US" -r

Set the Chef extension without a run-list

$ azure vm extension set-chef your-vm-name --validation-pem ~/chef-repo/.chef/testorg-validator.pem --client-config ~/chef-repo/.chef/client.rb --version "1201.12"

Set the Chef extension with a run-list

$ azure vm extension set-chef your-vm-name --validation-pem ~/chef-repo/.chef/testorg-validator.pem --client-config ~/chef-repo/.chef/client.rb --version "1201.12" -R 'recipe[your_cookbook_name::your_recipe_name]'

PowerShell Cmdlets

If Windows PowerShell is installed on the workstation, along with the Azure Chef Extension, the Get-AzureVMChefExtension and Set-AzureVMChefExtension extensions may be used to manage Chef running on virtual machines in Microsoft Azure.

Get-AzureVMChefExtension

Use the Get-AzureVMChefExtension cmdlet to get the details for the Azure Chef Extension that is running on the named virtual machine.

Syntax

This cmdlet has the following syntax:

Get-AzureVMChefExtension -VM <string>
Example

The following examples show how to use the Get-AzureVMChefExtension cmdlet:

Get details for a virtual machine

$ Get-AzureVM -ServiceName cloudservice1 -Name azurevm1 | Get-AzureVMExtension

Set-AzureVMChefExtension

Use the Set-AzureVMChefExtension cmdlet to enable Chef on any virtual machine running on Microsoft Azure.

Syntax

This cmdlet has the following syntax.

For Microsoft Windows:

Set-AzureVMChefExtension -ValidationPem <String> -VM <IPersistentVM> -Windows [-ChefServerUrl <String> ] [-ClientRb <String> ] [-OrganizationName <String> ] [-RunList <String> ] [-ValidationClientName <String> ] [-Version <String> ] [ <CommonParameters>]

For Linux:

Set-AzureVMChefExtension -Linux -ValidationPem <String> -VM <IPersistentVM> [-ChefServerUrl <String> ] [-ClientRb <String> ] [-OrganizationName <String> ] [-RunList <String> ] [-ValidationClientName <String> ] [-Version <String> ] [ <CommonParameters>]
Options

This cmdlet has the following options:

-AutoUpdateChefClient
Auto-update the chef-client. Set to true to auto update the version of the Azure Chef Extension when the virtual machine is restarted. For example, if this option is enabled, a virtual machine that has version 1205.12.2.0 will be updated automatically to 1205.12.2.1 when it is published.
-BootstrapOptions <string>

A JSON string that is added to the first run of a chef-client. For example:

-BootstrapOptions '{"chef_node_name":"test_node"}'

Supported options: "chef_node_name", "chef_server_url" (required), "environment", "secret", and "validation_client_name" (required).

-ChefServerUrl <string>
The URL for the Chef server.
-ClientRb <string>
The path to the client.rb file.
-DeleteChefConfig
Disable the Azure Chef Extension extension.
-Linux
Sets the Azure Chef Extension to run Linux.
-OrganizationName <string>
The name of the organization on the Chef server.
-RunList <string>
A comma-separated list of roles and/or recipes to be applied.
-ValidationClientName <string>
The name of the chef-validator key that is used by the chef-client to access the Chef server during the initial chef-client run.
-ValidationPem  <string>
The location of the file that contains the key used when a chef-client is registered with a Chef server. A validation key is signed using the validation_client_name for authentication. Default value: /etc/chef/validation.pem.
-Version <string>
Specify the version number for the Azure Chef Extension extension. Default is to use the latest extension’s version number.
-Windows
Sets the Azure Chef Extension to run Microsoft Windows.
Examples

The following examples show how to use the Set-AzureVMChefExtension cmdlet:

Create Windows virtual machine

$vm1 = "azurechefwin"
$svc = "azurechefwin"
$username = 'azure'
$password = 'azure@123'

$img = "a699494373c04fc0bc8f2bb1389d6106__Windows-Server-2012-R2-201406.01-en.us-127GB.vhd"

$vmObj1 = New-AzureVMConfig -Name $vm1 -InstanceSize Small -ImageName $img

$vmObj1 = Add-AzureProvisioningConfig -VM $vmObj1 -Password $password -AdminUsername $username –Windows

# set azure chef extension
$vmObj1 = Set-AzureVMChefExtension -VM $vmObj1 -ValidationPem "C:\\users\\azure\\msazurechef-validator.pem" -ClientRb
"C:\\users\\azure\\client.rb" -RunList "getting-started" -Windows

New-AzureVM -Location 'West US' -ServiceName $svc -VM $vmObj1

Create CentOS virtual machine

$vm1 = "azurecheflnx"
$svc = "azurecheflnx"
$username = 'azure'
$password = 'azure@123'

# CentOS image id
$img = "5112500ae3b842c8b9c604889f8753c3__OpenLogic-CentOS-71-20150605"

$vmObj1 = New-AzureVMConfig -Name $vm1 -InstanceSize Small -ImageName $img

$vmObj1 = Add-AzureProvisioningConfig -VM $vmObj1 -Password $password -Linux -LinuxUser $username

# set azure chef extension
$vmObj1 = Set-AzureVMChefExtension -VM $vmObj1 -ValidationPem "C:\\users\\azure\\msazurechef-validator.pem" -ClientRb
"C:\\users\\azure\\client.rb" -RunList "getting-started" -Linux

New-AzureVM -Location 'West US' -ServiceName $svc -VM $vmObj1

Create Ubuntu virtual machine

$vm1 = "azurecheflnx"
$svc = "azurecheflnx"
$username = 'azure'
$password = 'azure@123'

$img = "b39f27a8b8c64d52b05eac6a62ebad85__Ubuntu-12_04_5-LTS-amd64-server-20150127-en-us-30GB"

$vmObj1 = New-AzureVMConfig -Name $vm1 -InstanceSize Small -ImageName $img

$vmObj1 = Add-AzureProvisioningConfig -VM $vmObj1 -Password $password -Linux -LinuxUser $username

# set azure chef extension
$vmObj1 = Set-AzureVMChefExtension -VM $vmObj1 -ValidationPem "C:\\users\\azure\\msazurechef-validator.pem" -ClientRb
"C:\\users\\azure\\client.rb" -RunList "getting-started" -Linux

New-AzureVM -Location 'West US' -ServiceName $svc -VM $vmObj1

knife azure server create

If knife azure plugin is installed on the workstation, along with the Azure Chef Extension, the server create knife plugin may be used to manage Chef running on virtual machines in Microsoft Azure.

Syntax

This command has the following syntax:

$ knife azure server create (options)

Options

This command has the following options:

--auto-update-client
Auto-update the chef-client. Set to true to auto update the version of the Azure Chef Extension when the virtual machine is restarted. For example, if this option is enabled, a virtual machine that has version 1205.12.2.0 will be updated automatically to 1205.12.2.1 when it is published.
--azure-extension-client-config
The path to the client.rb file.
--bootstrap-version
Ubuntu and CentOS only. The version of the chef-client to install.
--delete-chef-extension-config
Disable the Azure Chef Extension extension.
-j, --json-attributes

A JSON string that is added to the first run of a chef-client. For example:

-j '{"chef_node_name":"test_node"}'

Supported options: --bootstrap-version, --environment, --[no-]node-verify-api-cert, --node-name, --node-ssl-verify-mode, --secret-file, and --server-url (required).

-r, --run-list
A comma-separated list of roles and/or recipes to be applied.

Examples

The following examples show how to use the knife azure server create command:

Create Windows virtual machine

$ knife azure server create -I "123abc__Windows-Server-2012-Datacenter-201411.01-en.us-127GB.vhd"\n
                          --azure-vm-size Medium -x 'azureuser' -P 'azure@123' --bootstrap-protocol\n
                          'cloud-api' -c '~/chef-repo/.chef/knife.rb' -r 'recipe[getting-started]'\n
                          --azure-service-location "West US" -VV

Create Linux virtual machine

$ knife azure server create -I "123abc__Ubuntu_DAILY_BUILD-trusty-14_04_1-LTS-amd64-server-etc"\n
                            --azure-vm-size Medium -x 'azureuser' -P 'azure@123' --bootstrap-protocol 'cloud-api'\n
                            -c '~/chef-repo/.chef/knife.rb' -r 'recipe[getting-started]'\n
                            --azure-service-location "West US" -VV

Azure Resource Manager (ARM) Templates

If you are using Azure Resource Manager templates to create your infrastructure you can use the Chef extension to have Azure handle the bootstraping/configuration of your node to your Chef Server.

Options

The extension has the following options that can be provided in the settings hash.

runlist
A comma-separated list of roles and/or recipes to be applied.
client_rb
A JSON escaped string containing the content of your client.rb file.
validation_key_format
Tells the extension whether the supplied validation key is plaintext or base64encoded.

..note:: If using the Chef extension in an ARM template, it is recommended that you base64 encode your validation key and set this option to base64encoded

bootstrap_version
The version of chef-client that will be installed on the system. linux only

..note:: Due to constraints in Azure, the bootstrap_version option is only available on the LinuxChefClient extension.

bootstrap_options
A hash of the following options: chef_node_name, chef_server_url, environment, secret, and validation_client_name.

..note:: Options that are supplied in the bootstrap items will take presidence over any conflicts found in the client.rb

chef_node_name
Determines which configuration should be applied and sets the client_name, which is the name used when authenticating to a Chef server. The default value is the FQDN of the chef-client, as detected by Ohai. In general, Chef recommends that you leave this setting blank and let Ohai assign the FQDN of the node as the node_name during each chef-client run.
chef_server_url
The URL for the Chef server.
environment
The environment this machine will be placed in on your Chef server.
secret
The encryption key that is used for values contained within a data bag item.
validation_client_name
The name of the chef-validator key that is used by the chef-client to access the Chef server during the initial chef-client run.
node_ssl_verify_mode
Set the verify mode for HTTPS requests.
node_verify_api_cert
Verify the SSL certificate on the Chef server. When true, the chef-client always verifies the SSL certificate. When false, the chef-client uses the value of ssl_verify_mode to determine if the SSL certificate requires verification.

Protected Settings [ The following options can be provided to the extension through the protectedSettings hash.

validation_key
The contents of your organization validator key, the format is dependent on validation_key_format.
chef_server_crt
The SSL certificate of your Chef server that will be added to the trusted certificates.
client_pem
A client key that will be used to communication with the Chef server.

Examples

The following examples show how the chef-client can be installed and configured from an ARM template.

Installing the Azure Chef extension on a Linux system

{
   "type": "Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachines/extensions",
   "name": "myVirtualMachine/LinuxChefClient",
   "apiVersion": "2015-05-01-preview",
   "location": "westus",
   "properties": {
     "publisher": "Chef.Bootstrap.WindowsAzure",
     "type": "LinuxChefClient",
     "typeHandlerVersion": "1210.12",
     "settings": {
       "bootstrap_options": {
         "chef_node_name": "node1",
         "chef_server_url": "https://api.chef.io/organizations/my-chef-organization",
         "validation_client_name": "my-chef-organization-validator"
       },
       "runlist": "recipe[awesome_customers_rhel],recipe[yum],role[base]",
       "validation_key_format": "plaintext"
     },
     "protectedSettings": {
       "validation_key": "-----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----\nMIIEpQIB..\n67VT3Dg=\n-----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----"
     }
   }
 }

Installing the Azure Chef extension on a Windows system

{
  "type": "Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachines/extensions",
  "name": "myVirtualMachine/ChefClient",
  "apiVersion": "2015-05-01-preview",
  "location": "westus",
  "properties": {
    "publisher": "Chef.Bootstrap.WindowsAzure",
    "type": "ChefClient",
    "typeHandlerVersion": "1210.12",
    "settings": {
      "bootstrap_options": {
        "chef_node_name": "node12",
        "chef_server_url": "https://api.chef.io/organizations/my-chef-organization",
        "validation_client_name": "my-chef-organization-validator"
      },
      "runlist": "recipe[awesome_customers_windows],recipe[iis],role[windows_base]",
      "validation_key_format": "plaintext"
    },
    "protectedSettings": {
      "validation_key": "-----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----\nMIIEpQIB..\n67VT3Dg=\n-----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----"
    }
  }
}

Installing the Azure Chef extension on a Linux system with SSL peer verification turned off and given a data bag secret

{
   "type": "Microsoft.Compute/virtualMachines/extensions",
   "name": "myVirtualMachine/LinuxChefClient",
   "apiVersion": "2015-05-01-preview",
   "location": "westus",
   "properties": {
     "publisher": "Chef.Bootstrap.WindowsAzure",
     "type": "LinuxChefClient",
     "typeHandlerVersion": "1210.12",
     "settings": {
       "bootstrap_options": {
         "chef_node_name": "node1",
         "chef_server_url": "https://api.chef.io/organizations/my-chef-organization",
         "validation_client_name": "my-chef-organization-validator",
         "node_ssl_verify_mode": "none",
         "secret": "KCYWGXxSrkgR..."
       },
       "runlist": "recipe[awesome_customers_rhel],recipe[yum],role[base]",
       "validation_key_format": "base64encoded"
     },
     "protectedSettings": {
       "validation_key": "LS0tLS1CRUdJTiBSU0EgUFJ...FIEtFWS0tLS0t"
     }
   }
 }

Note

Here we’re also base64 encoding our validator key which is a recommended approach when using the Azure Chef extension in an ARM template

Log Files

If the Azure portal displays an error in dashboard, check the log files. The log files are created by the chef-client. The log files can be accessed from within the Azure portal or by running the chef-client on the node itself and then reproducing the issue interactively.

From the Azure portal

Log files are available from within the Azure portal:

  1. Select Virtual Machines in the left pane of the Azure portal.

  2. Select the virtual machine that has the error status.

  3. Click the Connect button at the bottom of the portal to launch a Windows Remote Desktop session, and then log in to the virtual machine.

  4. Start up a Windows PowerShell command shell.

    $ cd c:\windowsazure\logs
      ls –r chef*.log
    
  5. This should display the log files, including the chef-client log file.

From the chef-client

The chef-client can be run interactively by using Windows Remote Desktop to connect to the virtual machine, and then running the chef-client:

  1. Log into the virtual machine.

  2. Start up a Windows PowerShell command shell.

  3. Run the following command:

    $ chef-client -l debug
    
  4. View the logs. On a linux system, the Chef client logs are saved to /var/log/azure/Chef.Bootstrap.WindowsAzure.LinuxChefClient/<extension-version-number>/chef-client.log and can be viewed using the following command:

    $ tail -f /var/log/azure/Chef.Bootstrap.WindowsAzure.LinuxChefClient/1210.12.102.1000/chef-client.log
    

Troubleshoot Log Files

After the log files have been located, open them using a text editor to view the log file. The most common problem are below:

  • Connectivity errors with the Chef server caused by incorrect settings in the client.rb file. Ensure that the chef_server_url value in the client.rb file is the correct value and that it can be resolved.
  • An invalid validator key has been specified. This will prevent the chef-client from authenticating to the Chef server. Ensure that the validaton_client_name value in the client.rb file is the correct value
  • The name of the node is the same as an existing node. Node names must be unique. Ensure that the name of the virtual machine in Microsoft Azure has a unique name.
  • An error in one the run-list. The log file will specify the details about errors related to the run-list.

For more information ...

For more information about Microsoft Azure and how to use it with Chef: